Movie News

Chewbacca Smacks a Porg in Star Wars: The Last Jedi Trailer: Go Behind the Scenes of the Movie

Chewbacca Smacks a Porg in Star Wars: The Last Jedi Trailer: Go Behind the Scenes of the Movie
Bb-8 was the scene-stealer in 2015's Star Wars: The Force Awakens, but the droid felt like a distant memory the moment a porg popped up in the first trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Lucasfilm aired a new 15-second TV spot during the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on NBC Thursday. Though it didn't reveal any major plot points, given its compact time constraints, it did show Chewbacca smacking a porg while piloting the Millennium Falcon—and fans loved it. Directed by Rian Johnson, Star Wars: The Last Jedi is in theaters Dec. 15. The ensemble cast includes Kenny Baker (R2-D2), John Boyega (Finn), Gwendoline Christie (Captain Phasma), Anthony Daniels (C-3Po), Benicio Del Toro...
See full article at E! Online »

Box Office: 'Coco' Trots Past 'Justice League' With $13.2M Wednesday

Box Office: 'Coco' Trots Past 'Justice League' With $13.2M Wednesday
As the long Thanksgiving holiday got underway, Disney and Pixar's Coco danced its way past holdover Justice League on Wednesday with an opening-day gross of $13.2 million after nabbing an A+ CinemaScore.

Wednesday's haul included $2.3 million in Tuesday night previews. Coco is playing in 3,987 theaters in North America.

Justice League took in $10.5 million from 4,051 theaters for a domestic total of $122.4 million.

At this pace, Coco, about the popular Mexican holiday Day of the Dead, should have no trouble winning the turkey trot with a five-day debut north of $70 million.

Between them, Disney...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘The Death Of Stalin’ Wins Three British Independent Film Awards

  • Deadline
‘The Death Of Stalin’ Wins Three British Independent Film Awards
Armando Iannucci's political satire The Death of Stalin has taken an early lead at The British Independent Film Awards – picking up three awards as part of the event's newly introduced craft section. The Death of Stalin, which stars Andrea Riseborough, Rupert Friend, Paddy Considine, Steve Buscemi and Jeffrey Tambor and centers on the last days of the Soviet dictator, won Best Casting for Sarah Crowe, Best Production Design for Cristina Casali and Best Make Up & Hair…
See full article at Deadline »

‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ First Footage: Watch Chris Pratt Play With A Baby Raptor

  • Indiewire
‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ First Footage: Watch Chris Pratt Play With A Baby Raptor
The first footage from “Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom” has arrived courtesy of Colin Trevorrow’s Twitter account, which has posted an adorable video of Chris Pratt playing with a baby raptor. It’s unclear whether or not the footage is from the actual movie or if it was just taken on set, nor is it confirmed if the baby raptor is CGI or an animatronic. “The Impossible” director J.A. Boyena has promised more practical effects in the sequel.

“Obviously you don’t have real dinosaurs — sometimes you have people playing dinosaurs — but we love animatronics and we’re trying to do as much with them as possible,” he said of the sequel. “I think animatronics bring soul and reality to it. We’re trying to find the balance between animatronics and CGI in order to cheat the audience so they
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Happy Death Day’ Reaps $100M+ At Worldwide Box Office

  • Deadline
‘Happy Death Day’ Reaps $100M+ At Worldwide Box Office
The hits keep coming for Universal and Blumhouse with Happy Death Day celebrating a $100M global milestone. Including yesterday’s grosses, the latest collaboration between Uni and Jason Blum’s micro-budget specialist Blumhouse has taken in $55.5M domestically and $44.6M at the international box office. Directed by Christopher Landon, Happy Death Day is the third original film from Blumhouse in 2017. It joins blockbuster pics Split and Get Out which have grossed $278.3M…
See full article at Deadline »

Mar del Plata: Argentina on the Rise – Gustavo Biazzi

Mar Del Plata, Argentina — Lensed with a continuous verve from the first shot of the protagonist, Ernesto, running to catch his girlfriend at a viva at university, there’s hardly a shot in the first three-quarters of Gustavo Biazzi’s “Los Vagos” (“The Bums”) where Ernesto or the camera is not on the move, sometimes making highly technical demanding shots look easy. That of course is to be expected from one of Argentina’s most reputed young cinematographers, whose credits take in Santiago Mitre’s “The Student” and Cannes Critics’ Week winner “Paulina.” It also reflects the movie’s subject. On holiday in Misiones, Ernesto leaving behind his girlfriend from childhood, the high-achiever Paula, for a riverside holiday with his laddish friends back home. Together, they hit parties, chase girls, booze themselves into stupor, as Ernesto searches for he’s not sure what as an alternative to Paula. Produced by Santiago Carabante and La Union de los
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Aladdin’ Turns 25: Creators on the Real Beginning of the Disney Renaissance

‘Aladdin’ Turns 25: Creators on the Real Beginning of the Disney Renaissance
Before Disney’s animated blockbuster “Aladdin” had its premiere in Japan, directors Ron Clements and John Musker were told not to worry if the audience didn’t laugh.

And it wasn’t because the Japanese performer who dubbed Robin Williams’ shape-shifting Genie didn’t capture the actor’s brilliant off-the-wall comedic performance.

“They tell you ahead of time, ‘don’t worry because the audience won’t laugh, because a Japanese audience doesn’t laugh,”’ noted Clements. “They just sit respectfully.”

But they did laugh at Genie, who turns into everybody from Ed Sullivan to William F. Buckley to former talk show host Arsenio Hall.

“Probably the biggest laugh in the whole screening was when he turned into Arsenio Hall and did his ‘Woof, woof, woof’ with his arm,” said Clements. “I was asking somebody afterward about that and why it got such a big laugh. They said ‘Oh, we loved it when the Genie turned into Julia Roberts
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Directors Call for Overhaul of Berlin Film Festival After Dieter Kosslick Departs

Directors Call for Overhaul of Berlin Film Festival After Dieter Kosslick Departs
A group of 79 German filmmakers including Maren Ade (“Tony Erdmann”), Fatih Akin (“In the Fade”) and Robert Schwentke (“The Captain”) has called for “a new start” for the Berlin Film Festival after longtime festival director Dieter Kosslick’s contract expires in 2019.

In an open letter published by Spiegel Online, the filmmakers recommend the formation of a gender-balanced international selection committee charged with finding Kosslick’s successor and weighing fundamental changes to the event.

“The goal must be to find an outstanding curatorial personality who is passionate about cinema, well-connected internationally and capable of leading the festival into the future on an equal footing with Cannes and Venice,” the letter read. “We want a transparent procedure and a new start.”

The letter, whose signatories also include Andreas Dresen, Sebastian Schipper, Volker Schlöndorff, Dominik Graf, Christian Petzold, Doris Dörrie, Maria Schrader, Hans-Christian Schmid and Rosa von Praunheim, is seen as a public rebuke of the Kosslick era, during which the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Guillermo del Toro Explains Why He’s Interviewing George Miller & Michael Mann During His Sabbatical

Last month, Guillermo del Toro announced he was taking a year long sabbatical from directing, but he won’t just be sitting around the house. The director will not only keep his hands busy producing, but he taking some time to interview filmmaking legends Michael Mann and George Miller. It might be for a book or documentary (or maybe none of those things), but for del Toro it’s chance to celebrate their work and learn from the masters.

Continue reading Guillermo del Toro Explains Why He’s Interviewing George Miller & Michael Mann During His Sabbatical at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Oscar Beat: Best Picture Predictions – The Field Starts to Take Shape

If you’ve been following along with these Oscar Beat columns for the past couple of months, in the early days of the Oscar race, you’re aware that the theme of this year’s race seems to be that there is no theme. Everyone’s a bit wary of holding to old standards in the wake of last year’s big surprises, and the heavy influx of a younger, more diverse group of Academy voters has everyone wondering just what kind of changes this will reflect. More than that, though, there just hasn’t been one huge frontrunner that’…
See full article at Collider.com »

Gift Guide 2017: ‘Star Wars’, Superheroes, Video Games, and More!

Welcome to Black Friday 2017! If you're smart, then you're reading this all cozy, safe and sound inside your own home and you're doing your first round of holiday shopping from your keyboard. (Smarter still, you've got all your shopping done already.) In order to help facilitate your clickable purchases, we've put together a list of gifts for the nerd/cinephile/comic aficionado/animation fanatic in your life, even if that person is you! We've pulled these gift suggestions from the bread and butter of our coverage here, namely Star Wars, superheroes of all …
See full article at Collider.com »

David Fincher Explains “The Problem With Auteurism”

The idea of the auteur is a somewhat romantic notion. The term suggests that a director is the sole author of his work, putting an artistic imprint on a film or television show that is so singular, that the vision is solely theirs. However, accepting the idea of auteurism means ignoring the collaborative nature of filmmaking, and the many happy accidents, mistakes, or unavoidable changes that happen along the way to the finished product.

David Fincher‘s films undeniably contain a number of trademarks that are attributable to the director, but don’t you dare call him an auteur.

Continue reading David Fincher Explains “The Problem With Auteurism” at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Game of Thrones’: Emilia Clarke and Kit Harington to Compete for Lead Actor in 2018

‘Game of Thrones’: Emilia Clarke and Kit Harington to Compete for Lead Actor in 2018
Game of Thrones” Season 7 premiered too late to be eligible for this year’s Emmys (“The Handmaid’s Tale” won Best Drama Series after “Thrones'” two-year winning streak), but the fantasy epic now has its sights set on returning to awards season and winning big at the Golden Globes. Gold Derby reports HBO will be shaking up their strategy and submitting Emilia Clarke and Kit Harington in the lead acting races.

Read More:‘Game of Thrones’ is Filming Season 8 Until Summer 2018 (Which Means We Won’t See it For A While)

In the past, all “Game of Thrones” cast members have been submitted in the supporting actor races for award shows like the Globes, Emmys, and SAG Awards. Clearly, HBO is hoping to increase its chances on landing nominations for “Thrones” by moving Clarke and Harington to the lead races. Neither actor has ever received a Golden Globe nomination. Clarke
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Star Wars’: Rian Johnson Discusses The Upcoming New Trilogy

Earlier this month, Lucasfilm gave us the surprising news that Rian Johnson, director of the forthcoming “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” would be starting a brand new “Star Wars” trilogy from scratch and that it wouldn’t be related to the original Skywalker story. Details are being kept hush-hush at the moment, we don’t know necessarily where this latest trilogy would take place nor do we know if any familiar characters would be jumping into this latest vision of the franchise.

Continue reading ‘Star Wars’: Rian Johnson Discusses The Upcoming New Trilogy at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Songs For Screens: Active Child Offers Woke Spiritualism; Sonos Hosts A Deee-Lite-ful Holiday Dance Party

Songs For Screens: Active Child Offers Woke Spiritualism; Sonos Hosts A Deee-Lite-ful Holiday Dance Party
“Songs for Screens” (formerly known as “Synch This”) is a Variety column written by Andrew Hampp, a VP at New York-based music sponsorship and experiential agency Mac Presents and former branding correspondent for Billboard. Each week, the column will highlight noteworthy use of music in advertising and marketing campaigns, as well as new and catalog songs that we deem ripe for synch use.

Remember slow news days? Me neither. Where the latest news cycles have become relentlessly negative as the world does some serious soul-searching, pop music has become either deliberately escapist (witness Ed Sheeran’s “Shape of You,” the entirety of Taylor Swift’s “Reputation”), innocuous (the back-to-back Hot 100 No. 1s of Cardi B and Post Malone) or downright nihilistic (hardcore rap).

As ad agencies and TV showrunners alike wrestle with how to incorporate the current political climate into their latest commercials and prime-time hits (some more successfully than others), a new niche is being carved
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Phantom of the Paradise’ and Finding a Movie to Call Your Own

‘Phantom of the Paradise’ and Finding a Movie to Call Your Own
We all have a movie that we consider to be “ours.” Whether it be the one that our family showed us as kids, the one we saw on a dark stormy night at a sleepover, or one we just discovered on TV, everyone eventually finds a movie that is as much a part of them as their own vital organs. […]

The post ‘Phantom of the Paradise’ and Finding a Movie to Call Your Own appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Sgiff: Movie Legend Waheeda Rehman Lauds Contemporary Indian Cinema

Sgiff: Movie Legend Waheeda Rehman Lauds Contemporary Indian Cinema
Waheeda Rehman, the 79-year-old grande dame of Indian cinema who has worked with most of the legendary filmmakers of her country during her 62-year career is very complimentary about the kind of films being made today.

“All kinds of stories are being today,” Rehman said. “Back in the day, films used to be formulaic. There was a hero, heroine and a villain, and there would be a cabaret number thrown in for good measure. I got very bored and began looking for different roles.”

Rehman was speaking at an In Conversation event for “The Song of Scorpions” that showed as a special presentation at the Singapore International Film Festival on Friday. Other speakers included director Anup Singh and producers Shahaf Peled and Saskia Vischer.

The roles Rehman chose were in films that are considered classics in the annals of Indian cinema. She worked with Guru Dutt in “Pyaasa” (1957) and “Kaagaz Ke Phool” (1959), Satyajit Ray in “Abhijaan” (1962), Basu Bhattacharya
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Noah Baumbach Defends Netflix, But Explains Why Smaller Movies Must Be Seen In Cinemas

It didn’t take much time for the screening of Bong Joon Ho‘s “Okja” to create a stir at Cannes. The film started off being booed not for its alliance to producer Netflix, but because of a technical glitch which projected the film in the wrong aspect ratio. The film came to a screeching halt and a seven-minute delay followed. Once the film started again, booing happened for the reason we all thought it would: the Netflix logo appearing on the screen.

Continue reading Noah Baumbach Defends Netflix, But Explains Why Smaller Movies Must Be Seen In Cinemas at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Godless’: Jeff Daniels Weighs in on His Infamous Line, ’This Ain’t My Death’

‘Godless’: Jeff Daniels Weighs in on His Infamous Line, ’This Ain’t My Death’
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “Godless.”]

The Old West was a lawless place, where nothing was certain except for dust and hardship. On Netflix’s limited series “Godless,” outlaw Frank Griffin was certain about one thing though: how he wasn’t going to die.

“This ain’t my death,” he says over and over again like a mantra. Whether he has a noose around his neck or a shotgun pointed at his heart, he holds onto that unshakeable belief. “This ain’t my death. I’ve seen my death; this ain’t it.”

Jeff Daniels, who portrays Frank Griffin, spoke to IndieWire about that infamous line. “If it were a song, it’d be a good hook,” he said. “You preface that with, ‘Is this it? No, it’s not it. This ain’t my death. I just checked. Didn’t get the feeling that this was it.’ And that’s kind of all he goes on.
See full article at Indiewire »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.